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Monday, 9 June 2014

Ornithologist's Alliance


This webpage is for sharing related educational, conservation and research purposes. 

An Earth Science Institute World Project: Titan Exploration Industries: Wildlife campaigners of the World welcomes 

CSPB Ornithologist's Alliance. 
A list of the birds that will be the focus project over the next few months.




Orkney Great Skua


This great pirate of the skies is infamous in Orkney for terrorising anyone who goes near its nest during the breeding season. Always known in Orkney as the bonxie, its dive-bombing tactics around your head can be scary, although it rarely draws blood! The bonxie will harass birds to steal food and kill smaller birds. This is a problem for other species when fish stocks are scarce. Its aggressive behaviour has earned it the nickname of the pirate of the skies. It breeds on moorland, so stick to the cliffs and you are less likely to disturb them into a defensive frenzy.
A spectacular bird in flight with its dark wings with white flashes, its wingspan is 125-140cm. There are 1,700 pairs in Orkney and the second largest colony in Britain is in Hoy. However, the population has declined by 23% over the past ten years. Winter is a bonxie-free time in Orkney as it spends the season off the coasts of Spain and Africa, returning to Orkney from early April.


 Crested tit
Crested tit

Crested Tits are similar to Marsh Tits and Willow Tits but, in Britain, Crested Tits are found only in the Caledonian forests of Scotland.

They have a relatively large head, which is a dirty white with a neat black crescent-shape running through and behind the eye, a black bib and collar. The pointed crest, which is speckled with black and white, is unique to British birds of this size. The upperparts are grey-brown and the underparts are whitish with buff coloured flanks. The bill is black and the legs are grey-olive.

Juveniles are browner, have a less pointed crest, and lack the black collar.



Chough
 Chough

While its black plumage identifies it as a crow, the chough (pronounced 'chuff') has a red bill and legs unlike any other member of the crow family. It has a restricted westerly distribution in the British Isles and because of its small population size and historically declining populations it is an Amber List species. It readily displays its mastery of flight with wonderful aerial displays of diving and swooping. Found in flocks in autumn and winter.

The white-tailed or sea eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) is found mainly in coastal areas and is the UK's largest bird of prey. Adults have a conspicuous pale head and neck, a white tail and yellow beak. Immature birds are much darker brown with a black beak initially and very limited white in the tail. They take around 5 years to reach adult plumage through a series of moults where the plumage become paler brown. Over the same time the beak becomes increasingly yellowish and the tail whiter.



Capercaillie
 Capercaillie

A huge woodland grouse, the large black males are unmistakable. They spend a lot of time feeding on the ground, but may also be found in trees, feeding on shoots. localised breeding species, found in Scottish native pinewood, a rare and vulnerable habitat, and in commercial conifer plantations. The UK capercaillie population has declined so rapidly that it is at very real risk of extinction (for the second time) and is a 'Red List' species.


Corncrake
 Corncrake

Corncrakes are related to moorhens, coots and rails but differ from most members of the family in that they live on dry land. They are very secretive, spending most of their time hidden in tall vegetation, their presence only betrayed by their rasping call. In flight their bright chestnut wings and trailing legs are unmistakable. They are summer visitors and migrate to Africa for the winter.


Osprey
 Osprey

Seen in flight from below the osprey has white or slightly mottled underparts. The long wings are angled, bending at the 'wrist' which has a black patch contrasting with the white wing linings, and at a distance it could be mistaken for a large gull. This spectacular fish-eating bird of prey is an Amber List species because of its historical decline (due to illegal killing), and low breeding numbers.



Exploring the World online, Researching, Archiving oh and we also campaign for the rare & awesome Animals of this Planet!


Caledonian Society for the Protection of Birds. CSPB is a network of Ornithologist's & trusted volunteers across Scotland, Conservation biologists with the main focus on rare or endangered species "Discipline with a deadline" providing information about Scotland’s wild birds.



NHBS (Services) posted June 10, 2014, 6:31 AM by Odin Prometheus [ updated Jun 10, 2014, 2:49 PM ]

NHBS (Services)

The Handbook of Bird Identification: For Europe and the Western Palearctic.
View larger images

Field / Identification Guide
Out of Print

Series: Helm Identification Guide Series
Mark Beaman (Author), Steve Madge (Author), Hilary Burn (Illustrator), Martin Elliott(Illustrator), Alan Harris (Illustrator), Peter Hayman (Illustrator), Laurel Tucker (Illustrator), Dan Zetterström (Illustrator)
868 pages, 357 plates with colour illustrations, 625 colour distribution maps
Christopher Helm

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Hardback | Nov 1998[2010 reprint] | #17061 | ISBN: 0713639601

Out of Print Details

Via Aaron Svalberd

Project Leader at Ornithologist's Alliance. CSPB Caledonian Society for the Protection of Birds.
Ornithologist's Alliance
This webpage is for sharing related educational, conservation and research purposes.
An Earth Science Institute World Project: Titan Exploration Industries: Wildlife campaigners of the World welcomes
CSPB Ornithologist's Alliance.
Exploring the World online, Researching, Archiving oh and we also campaign for the rare & awesome Animals of this Planet!
Caledonian Society for the Protection of Birds. CSPB is a network of Ornithologist's & trusted volunteers across Scotland, Conservation biologists with the main focus on rare or endangered species "Discipline with a deadline" providing information about Scotland’s wild birds.

Garden Birds

Welcome to the Aviary


An illustrated guide to more than 70 wild birds of Britain's mountains, lowlands, rivers, lakes and shores, plus a selection of beautiful birds from other parts of the world. These pages are intended for newcomers to birdwatching, but we hope that experienced birders will enjoy the pictures of garden bird specieswater birds (including seabirds andcountryside birds of Britain as well as a few of the beautiful birds from mainland Europe and further afield.

Each image links to a page containing larger pictures, bird identification guides and details of food, breeding, nesting and habitat requirements for each of the bird species shown here.

Full details of some of the finest nature reserves and other sites that are brilliant for birds and bird watching, visit our 'Best for Birds' page in the Wales Wildlife section...



Bird Pictures
















Bird Pictures
















Searches related to endangered birds.

















Endangered Species

Endangered Species Search by Group


Find out what mammals, insects, fish, plants, etc. are endangered here. Use the selection box below to view full lists by group.



Eurasian golden oriole




The Eurasian golden oriole or simply golden oriole (Oriolus oriolus) is the only member of theoriole family ofpasserine birdsbreeding in northern hemisphere temperate regions. It is a summermigrant in Europe and western Asia and spends the winter season in central and southern Africa.


Endangered Birds: 50birds


Endangered Birds


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Ivory-billed Woodpecker, Chester A. Reed

Various reported sightings in East Texas in 1972, Cuba in 1986, and Louisiana in 2000 and 2004 left hope that Ivory-bills still lived. Unfortunately, the reports and follow up sightings are now believed to be mistaken. Deforestation caused the giant woodpecker's decline as each pair required at least ten square miles of low-land hardwood forests.






























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